free
web stats

Outreach

Here Nurse Lucy from the Kibale Health and Conservation Project is talking to school children about health issues, such as sanitation and the importance of mosquito nets to prevent malaria, and conservation, such as the suffering experience by chimpanzees when they put a hand in a snare, while they are strong enough to escape, the wire embeds in their skin, slowly tightens,  and their hand is cut off.  Colin Chapman believes that showing the upcoming generation about the value and wonders of nature is a very effective conservation strategy.

Here Nurse Lucy from the Kibale Health and Conservation Project is talking to school children about health issues, such as sanitation and the importance of mosquito nets to prevent malaria, and conservation, such as the suffering experience by chimpanzees when they put a hand in a snare, while they are strong enough to escape, the wire embeds in their skin, slowly tightens,  and their hand is cut off.  Colin Chapman believes that showing the upcoming generation about the value and wonders of nature is a very effective conservation strategy.

After I witnessed horrifying events, such as like chimpanzees losing their hands from snare injuries, I became motivated to make a difference and protect biodiversity. I have often stood on the edge of a park and to the back of me was a rich, vibrant ecosystem often brimming with the wildlife, while in front of me was a nearly naked landscape of over-grazed pasture land (Costa Rica) or a cropland (Uganda).

As a result, I am very active in communicating to the public through lectures, news and radio interviews, TV appearances, film projects, and especially in my activities with the National Geographic Society. I have also engaged the rural Uganda communities I work with to illustrate that Kibale something they should be proud of and is valuable to them.

During my career I have worked diligently to enhance the lives of the local communities living around Kibale by working with other to:

  • establish a chimpanzee ecotourism site that generates funding for the community (20% of the tourist fee goes directly to the community);
  • creating community ecotourism sites near volcanic crater lakes;
  • helping restoration efforts that have led to the reforestation of 7500 hectare and employed up to 360 villagers for almost a decade;
  • supervising 18 Ugandan students – one of whom became the Executive Director of the Uganda Wildlife Authority (UWA);
  • building and supporting Makerere University Biological Field Station by writing grants to build and equip the station, teaching numerous field courses, and developing a consortium of 22 supporting Universities;
  • establishing a medical clinic and then a mobile clinic that provides healthcare, vaccinations, AIDS testing and treatment, family planning, and conservation education to all the villages around the Kibale;
  • engaging with local communities by giving talks, and TV, radio interviews, and raising $70,000 from private donors to develop a Soap Opera about the need for family planning for radio that was written, preformed, and broadcast throughout Uganda and Rwanda.

Where possible, I have tested the long-term effectiveness of these programs. For example, one of his students elucidated the fact that the field station (for which he wrote some of the first funding grants to build – and continues to promote) provides long-term financial benefits to 720 people and  the mobile health clinic attends to 12,000 people each year.

Colin Chapman was a member of the Committee for Research and Exploration of the National Geographic Society.

Colin Chapman was a member of the Committee for Research and Exploration of the National Geographic Society.

For Scientific Editing see Michael Lawes